The Names of Canberra


Note: There are numerous instances of estate names becoming de facto suburb names in Canberra, such as Emu Ridge, in the suburb of Belconnen, Gleneagles, in the suburb of Kambah, Harcourt Hill, in the suburb of Nicholls, and Swinger Hill in the suburb of Phillip. These are all discrete estates within larger suburbs, but none of these names have been officially gazetted by the Australian Capital Territory Government. In recent years an application was made to the ACT Government by residents of Swinger Hill to have their estate name officially recognised as a suburb name, but this was rejected. The ACT Government has, however, erected official suburb signs for Swinger Hill, which it has not done for other estates.

Acton
Acton covers an area west of the CBD, bordered by Black Mountain to the west and Lake Burley Griffin in the south. The Australian National University campus covers most of the suburb. The area was named Acton in approximately 1843 by Lieutenant Arthur Jeffreys, RN, after a town in Denbighshire, Wales. The name of the area was kept as the suburb name when Canberra was built. The streets of Acton were named before individual themes for suburban street names were adopted.

Ainslie
A leafy locality in the Inner North of Canberra, it was one of the city's origtinal suburbs and is laid out very close to Walter Burley Griffin's original design in 1928. Its proximity to Reid, and near the Australian War Memorial makes it a desirable location to live. The suburb was named for James Ainslie, the first overseer of Duntroon Station in Canberra; employed by Robert Campbell to drive a mob of sheep south from Bathurst 'until he found suitable land'; Ainslie chose the Limestone Plains (the Canberra district) about 1825; he was overseer there for ten years before returning to Scotland. Ainslie was gazetted by the Government in 1928. It has many heritage listed homes, and parts of the suburb was gazetted onto the ACT Government's Heritage Register in 2004.

Amaroo
A suburb in the Canberra, Australia district of Gungahlin. It was gazetted on 18th October 1991. The name of the suburb is an Aboriginal word meaning `beautiful place'. Streets are named after Australian rivers and lakes. It is next to the suburbs of Ngunnawal, Gungahlin, Moncrieff, Forder, Bonner and Jacka.

Aranda
A suburb in the Canberra district of Belconnen. It is the eastern most suburb in Belconnen, located at the western foot of Black Mountain. The suburb derives its name from the Arrernte tribe of Central Australia, previously known as Arunta, which means 'White Cockatoo'. The streets in Aranda are named after Aboriginal tribal groups from around Australia. The suburb comprises an area of 160ha and in 1967 was the first suburb in Belconnen to be settled. As of the 2001 Australian census, Aranda had a population of 2443 residents.

Banks
A suburb in the Canberra district of Tuggeranong. It is the most southerly suburb of Canberra. Banks is named after Sir Joseph Banks (1743-1820), the botanist who accompanied Lieut. James Cook to the Pacific Ocean on which he entered Botany Bay in 1770. The suburb was gazetted on 12th March 1987. The theme of streets is botany or natural history.

Barton
Barton is named after Sir Edmund Barton, GCMG; Australia's first Prime Minister, 1901-03; barrister and Member of the New South Wales Parliament and one of the leading workers for Federation, serving on the Committee which prepared the draft for the Constitution; resigned from Parliament in 1903 to become the Senior Puisne Judge of the newly constituted High Court of Australia. Streets in Barton are named after colonial Governors. Barton is adjacent to Capital Hill. It contains the Department of The Prime Minister and Cabinet, Attorney-General's Department, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and several other Commonwealth government departments.

Belconnen
A district of Canberra, comprising 25 suburbs with 29,900 dwellings housing 82,247 people of the 311,518 people in the Australian Capital Territory (June 2001 Census). The second of a new towns planned for Canberra, it was inaugurated on 23rd June 1966. Early designs allowed for 120,000 residents. It contains the Belconnen Town Centre, Lake Ginninderra and residential areas, particularly to the south of the suburb, Emu Ridge, where significant numbers of medium density dwellings are located. It has an area of 4.39 km2 and was first settled in 1983. Belconnen is named after the original land grant of 800 ha to Charles Sturt the explorer for his exploration work. Sturt sold the property to Charles Campbell. The name is believed to be of Aboriginal origin.

Bonner
A planned suburb in the Canberra district of Gungahlin. Land for the suburb has been designated but as of mid 2005 building has not begun. The suburb is named after Senator Neville Bonner, Australia's first Indigenous parliamentarian.

Bonython
The suburb is named after Sir John Bonython, CMG; KCMG; Newspaper owner, politician and philanthropist; sole proprietor of the 'Adelaide Advertiser' from 1893-1929; Member of the first and second Federal Parliaments; made many important financial contributions, mainly to educational bodies which reflected his lifetime involvement in education, as well as a gift of 100,000 pounds in 1934 towards the cost of completing Parliament House, Adelaide. Original concept plans for Tuggeranong indicate that the suburb was initially to be known as "Stranger". The name "Bonython" was declared when it was gazetted as a suburb of Canberra on 17th October 1986. Streets are named afternotable South Australians, especially journalists, and South Australian place names. Prior to 1986, the land upon which Bonython now sits was grazing land, mainly grassland with scattered eucalypt trees.

Braddon
An inner north suburb of Canberra, located north of the Canberra CBD established in 1928, Braddon contains a commercial area centred on Mort and Lonsdale streets, which run parallel to Northbourne Avenue. Away from the commercial areas, much of the previously suburban housing in Braddon has been replaced with apartment buildings. One of the original suburbs on Walter Burley Griffin's master plan for Canberra, Braddon is named after Sir Edward Braddon, a Federalist, legislator and a participant in the writing of the Australian Constitution. Streets in Braddon are named after various things including aboriginal words, legislators and pioneers.

Bruce
A suburb in the Canberra district of Belconnen, Bruce was gazetted as a division on 6th June 1968 in recognition of Viscount Stanley Melbourne Bruce, the first Chancellor of the Australian National University from 1951 to 1961. The streets in Bruce are named after people and places associated with Australian tertiary education.

Calwell
A medium sized suburb. Tuggeranong Hill is on its southern border and it adjoins the suburbs of Theodore to the south, Richardson and Isabella Plains to the north. The suburb was named after the Labor politician, the Right Honourable Arthur Augustus Calwell, PC, (1896-1973), Member of Parliament, MHR for Melbourne, 1940-72; Minister for Information, 1943-49; Minister for Immigration, 1945-49; Deputy Leader of the Opposition, 1951-60; Leader of the Opposition, 1960-67. The name was gazetted 5th August 1975. Streets in the suburb are named in accordance with the theme of Victorian politicians.

Campbell
Covering an area to the South East of the central business district, Campbell sits at the base of Mount Ainslie. The suburb is named after Robert Campbell, the owner of Duntroon station on which Campbell is now located. Many buildings built by Robert Campbell and his family are still standing around Canberra, including Blundell's Cottage, St John the Baptist Church, Reid, Duntroon House (now part of RMC Duntroon) and Yarralumla House (now Government House). Campbell, one of Canberra's original suburbs, was established in 1928. Its street layout follows closely the design of Walter Burley Griffin.

Canberra
The site of Canberra was selected for the location of the nation's capital in 1908 as a compromise between age-old rivals Sydney and Melbourne, Australia's two largest cities. The name "Canberra" is derived from the local Ngabri people dialect, one of the Ngunnawal family groups, from the word Kanbarra meaning "meeting place" in the old Ngunnawal language. The Ngunnawal name was apparently used as a reference to corroborees held during the seasonal migration of the Ngunawal people to feast on the Bogong moths that pass through the region each spring.

White settlement of the area probably dates from 1824, when a homestead or station was built on what is now the Acton peninsula by stockmen employed by Joshua John Moore. He formally purchased the site in 1826, and named the property Canberry.

A variety of names were suggested for the capital, including Olympus, Paradise, Captain Cook, Shakespeare, Kangaremu, Eucalypta and Myola. The name of Canberra was eventually settled upon. At midday on 12th March 1913 the city was officially given this name by Lady Gertrude Denman the wife of the then Governor-General, at a ceremony on Kurrajong Hill (now known as Capital Hill) and building officially commenced. The city now commemorates this anniversary as "Canberra Day" each year.

Capital Hill
The location of Parliament House, Canberra, at the south apex of the land axis of the Parliamentary Triangle. The site was selected as the location of the Capitol in Walter Burley Griffin's Canberra design in 1912, which he envisaged to be "either a general administration structure for popular receptions and ceremony or for housing archives and commemorating Australian Achievements". The proposed building is commemorated in the name of the Capitol Theatre, Manuka. However, Griffin's name for the hill was subsequently changed to Capital Hill. It was previously named Kurrajong Hill and is around 2.5 km2, surrounded by a circular road (State Circle). Until the construction of the current Parliament House, the hill was covered with scrubby native bushland.

The construction of the current parliament building required removing much of the top half of the hill, and after construction, much of the earth was replaced on top of the building. The surrounding hill is landscaped with native plants, while the soil on top of parliament house is planted with lawn.

The streets that go out from Capital Hill are named after Australian capitals, and their direction roughly corresponds to the direction of that capital city, Brisbane Ave, Sydney Ave, Canberra Ave, Melbourne Ave, Adelaide Ave, Perth Ave, Hobart Ave and Darwin Ave. The streets which surround the hill in concentric circles are named after increasing spheres of influence with the inner-most circle called Parliament drive and then spanning out to Capital Circle, State Circle, National Circuit, Dominion Circuit and Empire Circuit.

Casey
A designated suburb in the Canberra, Australia district of Gungahlin. The suburb is planned, but building has not begun. It is next to the suburbs of Kinlyside, Taylor, lying to the west of Ngunnawal, ACT. It is named after Richard Gardiner Casey, Governor-General of Australia, 1965-69; elected to the Federal Parliament, 1931; served as a Minister from 1932-42 and 1950-60; appointed Member of the British War Cabinet and British Minister of State for the Middle East; appointed Governor of Bengal, 1944; accorded the rare accolade of the Garter, 1969.

Chapman
A suburb of Canberra located in the Weston Creek area. The suburb is named after Sir Austin Chapman, Member for Eden-Monaro (1901-1926). Born at Bong Bong, near Bowral, NSW; opened the Royal Hotel at Braidwood, 1889; held the Braidwood Seat in the Assembly as a Protectionist, 1891-1901; set up business as an auctioneer and commission agent; member of the local literary institute and secretary of the Braidwood Hospital and the Railway League; keen supporter of moves to introduce the old-age pension bill; enthusiastic advocate of Federation; won the seat of Eden-Monaro in the first Federal election and held it until 1926; Government Whip during the Barton ministry; Minister for Defence in the first Deakin Government of 1903-04, Postmaster-General in 1905-07 and Minister for Trade and Customs in 1907-08; chaired the Royal Commission of 1906 which successfully recommended old-age and invalid pensions; assigned the portfolios of Trade, Customs and Health, 1923; resigned from the ministry on the grounds of ill-health, 1924. Chapman's street names are associated with the Australian film industry.

Charnwood
Charnwood is a suburb in the Canberra district of Belconnen. Its design was based on the Radburn town planning principle where houses were to face common parkland, with the suburb's streets servicing garages situated at the rear of the houses. The design failed in its application however as home owners built fences around the "park side" of their blocks, effectively screening the houses away from the common parkland, creating long narrow fenced walkways with poor lighting and no neighbourhood surveillance. However the network of pathways ensures that it is possible to walk from any point in the suburb to any other without directly crossing a road, pedestrian bridges being used to cross the few major streets within the suburb. The suburb is named after former homestead in the Belconnen District; Henry Hall obtained a grant of 3492 acres of land which he named `Charnwood', 1833; named after the Forest of Charnwood in England." Streets within the suburb are named after Australian pioneer families.

Chifley
A suburb in the Canberra, Australia district of Woden.It was named after Joseph Benedict Chifley, Prime Minister, 1945-49; elected to the House of Representatives as Labour Member for Macquarie, 1928; Minister for Defence in the Scullin Government, 1929-32; Member of the Royal Commission on Banking and Monetary Reform, 1935; Federal Treasurer, 1941-45; Minister for Postwar Reconstruction, 1942-1945; Commonwealth Treasurer, 1941-49; Leader of the Opposition, 1949-51. Its streets are named after educationalists and scientists.

Chisholm
A suburb in the Canberra district of Tuggeranong, named after Caroline Chisholm, Philanthropist and social reformer; arrived in Australia with her husband, Captain Archibald Chisholm, in 1838; found positions for immigrant girls and sheltered many of them in her home; established employment agencies at many rural centres; with her husband, travelled throughout NSW collecting over 600 statements from immigrants about their lives in Australia; returned to England in 1846 where she established the Family Colonization Loan Society in 1849; the Society received the savings of intended emigrants to Australia, and lent them the balance of the passage money - the Australian agents found them employment and collected the repayment of the loan by easy instalments; she died in London in 1877. The name was gazetted on 5th August 1975, and streets are named after notable Australian women.

City Centre
Also kinown as Civic, it is the central business district of Canberra. It was officially established in 1927 and was meant to be called Civic Centre from Walter Burley Griffin's plan with a corresponding "Market Centre" located at what is now Russell, but Prime Minister Stanley Bruce vetoed the idea and it became officially known as City Centre. The idea of the "Market Centre" was abandoned. However, City Centre is still most commonly referred to as "Civic". Its streets are named after Australian pioneers, Aboriginal words and cawpital cities.

Conder
Conder is one of three suburbs in the Lanyon Valley in the district of Tuggeranong. As of 2005, the three suburbs were the southern most suburbs of the city, although the small settlement of Tharwa exists only a short distance further south. Named after artist Charles Edward Conder, painter, lithographer and fan designer; Member of the Heidelberg School and played a memorable part in the growth of the first Australian school of open-air painting; paintings include 'Springtime', and `Holiday at Mentone', 1888; represented in the Australian National Gallery, all Australian State and many regional galleries, the Jeu de Paume in Paris, the Tate Gallery in London and other public collections in the United Kingdom and America.

Cook
A suburb of Canberra in the district of Belconnen. As of the 2001 Australian Census, the population of Cook was 2,741. The suburb of Cook is named after Lieut. James Cook and the sixth Prime Minister of Australia Sir Joseph Cook (photo). The streets in Cook are names after notable women from Australian history.

Crace
A designated suburb in the Canberra district of Gungahlin. It was named after Edward Kendall Crace. The suburb is planned, but building has not yet begun as of 2007. Located in the suburb is the Canberra Nature Park of Gungaderra Grasslands nature reserve. The name honiours Edward Kendall Crace, one of the original settlers in the Gungahlin area. He became one of the largest landholders in the district; purchased the 'Gungahlin' and 'Ginninderra' properties from William Davis in 1877 and also acquired 'Charnwood'.

Curtin
Established in 1962, Curtin is a suburb in the Canberra district of Woden. Its name recalls John Joseph Curtin, Australia's leader during World War II, Prime Minister 1941-45; elected to the House of Representatives 1928 as Labour Member for Fremantle, Western Australia, and was Leader of the Opposition from 1935 to 1941; Prime Minister and Head of the War Cabinet from 1941 to his death in 1945. Its streets are named after state Premiers.

Deakin
Situated in south Canberra, Deakin is named after Alfred Deakin, Prime Minister, 1903-04, 1905-08, and 1909-10; Legislator, Federalist and one of the Founders of the Constitution; held the Liberal seat of West Bourke, 1880-89, and Essendon, 1889-1900; Attorney-General in the first Commonwealth Government; became Australia's second Prime Minister, 1903-04, after the resignation of Sir Edmund Barton. Streets in Deakin are named after Governors, Governors-General and diplomats. The official residence of the Prime Minister, The Lodge is located in Deakin.

Dickson
A suburb in the Inner North of Canberra,it is named after Sir James Dickson (1832-1901) who was a Queensland advocate of Australian Federation and one of the founders of the Australian Constitution. There is no specific theme for street names.

Downer
A suburb in Canberra in the Inner North. It was gazetted in 1960 and named after Sir John Downer (1844 - 1915) Premier of South Australia; Member of the Constitutional Committees of 1891, and 1897-98; Premier of South Australia, 1885-87 and from 1892-93; elected to South Australian Parliament in 1878 and remained undefeated in his electorate until resigning to become a member of the first Senate in 1901. There is no specific theme for street names. The buildings which make up the Downer community centre and former shops were built for the CSIRO in 1930s; the area now comprising Downer was an agricultural research facility for the CSIRO.

Dunlop
A suburb in the Canberra district of Belconnen. It is located at the far north-west end of Canberra, near the border with New South Wales. It is next to the suburbs of Fraser, Charnwood and Macgregor. Dunlop is named after Doctor and war veteran Sir Edward "weary" Dunlop; Sir Edward was revered by former POWs, both for his exploits as a doctor on the notorious Burma-Thailand railway and for his work among veterans in the post-war years.

Duffy
A suburb in the Canberra district of Weston Creek. Duffy was named in honour of Sir Charles Gavan Duffy, CMG; Prominent Federalist; MLA, Victoria, 1856-65, 1867-73 and 1876-80; Minister for Land, 1858-59 and 1861-63; Premier and Chief Secretary, 1871-73; Speaker, 1877-80; knighted in 1873. Streets in the suburb of Duffy are named after Australian dams and reservoirs. Duffy was gazetted as a placename in 1970.

Emu Ridge
A housing estate in the suburb of Belconnen, in the district of Belconnen. Many people consider Emu Ridge to be a suburb name, and it is widely used in Canberra, even on some (though not most) official maps. It does not, however, have any official standing as a place name. Emu Ridge as a place name helps some people differentiate this part of the suburb of Belconnen from the rest of the district of Belconnen. It's inherent "Australianness" as a name, and the fact that it is comprised of two words, which is rare in Canberra where most suburbs are named with the family name of a prominent Australian, also make it appealing to some.

Erindale
The Erindale Centre is a designated group centre located in the Canberra suburb of Wanniassa. It stands on the former site of the Erindale Homestead for which it is named, and serves the suburbs of Wanniassa, Monash, Gowrie, Fadden and Oxley. Erindale was developed in 1985, two years before the Tuggeranong Hyperdome and was intended as a district retail centre.

Evatt
A suburb in the Belconnen district of Canberra. It lies between the suburbs of McKellar, Belconnen, Florey, Melba and Spence. It is named after Herbert Vere Evatt (1894-1965) who was a leader of the opposition in the 1950s. The suburb was gazetted on 2nd November 1972. Streets in the suburb are named after people associated with parliament, and law professionals.

Fadden
A suburb in the Canberra district of Tuggeranong. The suburb is named after Sir Arthur Fadden, GCMG; Prime Minister, 1941; MHR for Darling Downs, 1936-49, and for McPherson, 1949-58; Leader of the Australian Country Party, 1941-58; Prime Minister, August-October 1941; Leader of the Opposition, 1941-43; Treasurer, 1949-58. It was gazetted on 5th August 1975. Streets are named after Queensland Politicians.

Farrer
A suburb in the Canberra, Australia district of Woden. Named for William James Farrer (1845-1906), Pioneer of scientific wheat-breeding in New South Wales; settled at Lambrigg near Canberra in 1886 and produced a large number of climatic wheats of commercial value. His work greatly extended the wheat belt and gave a lead to the breeding of disease-resistant wheats. Its street names recall Australian agriculturalists.

Fisher
A suburb of Canberra located in the district of Weston Creek. Fisher was named after Andrew Fisher (1862-1928), coal miner, founding member of the federal parliamentary Labor Party; Prime Minister, 1908-09, 1910-13, 1914-15; elected to Queensland Legislative Assembly, 1893, and to the first Federal Parliament, 1901; introduced a vast amount of legislation, including the acquisition of the Northern Territory from South Australia, and compulsory military training; Australian High Commissioner in London, 1916-21. The theme for the street names in Fisher is Australian mines and mining towns.

Florey
A residential suburb in the district of Belconnen. It was gazetted on 5th August, 1975 and most houses were constructed in the mid 1980s. The streets of Florey are named after Australian scientists. The suburb itself is named after Howard Walter Florey, Baron Florey of Adelaide and Marsden who shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1945 for his role in the extraction of penicillin.

Forde
A suburb in the Canberra district of Gungahlin in which construction started in 2006 as part of a joint venture between Delfin Lend Lease, Canberra Investment Corporation and the ACT Land Development Agency.. It is named for Frank Forde, a politician who was Prime Minister of Australia for a week in 1945 after the death of John Curtin. It is expected to eventually house approximately 2500 people by 2013.

Forrest
Forrest is named after Sir John Forrest, Legislator, surveyor, explorer; Member, WA Legislative Assembly from 1890-1901; attended the Federal Convention, 1891; led expedition to explore the country east and south of the Hampton Plains, 1871; expedition of 1879 opened valuable country in the Kimberley and Fitzroy districts. Forrest was one of the fathers of the Australian Constitution.

Streets in Forrest are named after explorers and colonial governors. Established in 1928, Forrest is one of the few suburbs in Canberra built to Walter Burley Griffin's original Canberra plans. It contains many circular and geometric patterns in its streets. Forrest was originally part of a suburb called Blanfordia which was gazetted in 1928. That name is no longer used. The original residents of Forrest were mostly senior public servants who were moved up from Melbourne.

Fraser
A suburb in the district of Belconnen. It lies at the north west end of Belconnen. The suburb is named after James Reay Fraser, who was Vice Chairman of the Joint Committee of the Australian Capital Territory from 1959-70. It was gazetted on 15th January 1974. Streets are named after early residents of Canberra.

Flynn
A suburb in the Canberra district of Belconnen. The suburb is named after John Flynn, the forerunner of the Flying Doctor Service in Australia. It was gazetted on 9th September 1971. Streets are named after workers in the flying doctor service.

Franklin
A suburb in the Canberra district of Gungahlin. Construction was well underway as of 2007. It is named after novelist Stella Maria (Miles) Franklin; her most famous novel, My Brilliant Career, was published in 1901; awarded the Prior Memorial Prize for her four-generation chronicle, 'All that Swagger', 1936; under the terms of her will, the Miles Franklin Award is made annually for an outstanding Australian novel. Its street names honour Australian writers, particularly women.

Fyshwick
An industrial suburb of Canberra, located east of the South Canberra district. It is also known for its adult entertainment industry, along with Mitchell, one of the two places in the ACT where there is legalised prostitution (which was decriminalised but limited to those two suburbs in 1992). It was named after Sir Philip Oakley Fysh, KCMG; Legislator, Federalist and one of the Founders of the Constitution; Premier of Tasmania from 1877 to 1878 and from 1887 to 1892; represented the State at the 1891 and 1897-98 Federal Conventions; held several Commonwealth portfolios before retiring from politics in 1910. The suffix "wick", from Old English, means "dwelling place" - and, by extension, "village" or "district". Its streets are named after Australian industrial towns and regions. The area's original name was intended to be Molonglo, after the Molonglo River.

Garran
A suburb in the Woden district of Canberra. Garran was named after Sir Robert Randolph Garran GCMG; Prominent in the campaign for Federation; Secretary, Drafting Committee, Federal Convention, 1897-98; Secretary, Commonwealth Attorney-General's Department, 1901-32; Commonwealth Solicitor-General, 1917-32; actively responsible for establishment of Canberra University College, and was Chairman of its Council from 1930-53; helped to establish the Australian National University and was recipient of its first degree (Honorary Doctor of Laws). The streets in Garran are named after Australian writers. The suburb was first settled in 1966.

Gilmore
A suburb in the Canberra district of Tuggeranong. The suburb is named after the poet and journalist, Dame Mary Gilmore OBE; Born Mary Jean Cameron at Cottawalla, New South Wales; sailed to Paraguay, South America, in 1895 to join Socialist settlement of Cosme; returned to Australia in 1902; wrote the women's page for the `Worker', Sydney, for twenty-three years; first book, `Married and Other Verses', appeared in 1910; awarded Australian Journalists' Association's Gold Medal for being the oldest working woman journalist in Australia; first woman in the Australian Workers Union and only woman on its committee. It was gazetted on 5th August 1975. Streets are named after predominantly female journalists.

Ginninderrra
A former landholding in the Canberra region, it later became the name of a district as well as a village. The surrounding area was the Ginninderra Parish. The landholding was originally called Palmerville after the first holder of the land grant, John Palmer, the New South Wales, Commissary General. It was John Palmer's son, George Thomas Palmer who established the property in 1826. In 1877 the property was sold to Edward Kendall Crace. On the property, Crace built a homestead that he called Gungahlin in 1833.

Giralang
A suburb in the Canberra district of Belconnen. The suburb is named after the word in the language of the Wirahuri Aboriginal tribe of the Central West of New South Wales, meaning 'star'. It was gazetted on 15th January 1974. Streets are named after Aboriginal words for stars seen from the southern hemisphere.

Gordon
A suburb in the Canberra district of Tuggeranong. The suburb is named after the poet Adam Lindsay Gordon (1833-1870), Poet and horseman; arrived in South Australia in 1852 and joined the South Australian Mounted Police as a trooper serving in the Mount Gambier region; resigned in 1855 and during the next fifteen years worked in many professions; Member of South Australia's Parliament, 1865-66; remembered mainly for his poetry; his first poem, `The Feud', appeared in 1864, others include `Ashtaroth', 'Sea Spray and Smoke Drift', 1867, and `Bush Ballands and Galloping Rhymes', 1870. It was gazetted on 12th March 1987. Streets are named after Sportsmen and Sportswomen.

Gowrie
A suburb of Canberra, located in the northern end of the Tuggeranong Valley. Tuggeranong suburbs are the southernmost of Australia's capital city. Gowrie is named after the Earl of Gowrie, Brigadier-General Alexander Gore Arkwright Hore-Ruthven (1872-1955) VC; PG; GCMG; DSO; 1st Baron of Canberra and Dirleton; Governor of South Australia, 1928-34, and New South Wales, 1935-36; Governor-General of Australia, 1936-44. Gowrie's streets are all named after members of the Australian Defence Force who won decorations, including the Victoria Cross. Gowrie is the former site of the Athllon Homestead.

Greenway
A suburb in the Canberra district of Tuggeranong. The suburb is named after the colonial architect, Francis Greenway (1777-1837). It was gazetted on 17th October 1986. The streets are named after architects. It includes the Tuggeranong Town Centre, Lake Tuggeranong and a small residential areas on the northwestern and northeastern shores of the lake.

Griffith
An early inner-south suburb of Canberra, established in 1927. Griffith is named after Sir Samuel Griffith, GCMG; Premier of Queensland and later Chief Justice of the Queensland Supreme Court; took a leading part in preparing the basis of the Australian Constitution; chosen in 1903 to be the first Chief Justice of the newly constituted High Court of Australia, retaining the position until his retirement in 1919. Streets in Griffith are named after explorers. Griffith contains the Manuka Shopping Centre, one of the earliest shopping areas built in Canberra. Griffith is one of Canberra's oldest suburbs, with most of its streets designed according to Walter Burley Griffin's original designs for Canberra.

Gungahlin
A suburb in the Canberra district with the same name; Gungahlin. Gungahlin is the name for the entire district, and also the town centre, but it is also the name of the suburb which Gungahlin Town Centre is in. Named after the Aboriginal word 'goongarline', meaning "little rocky hill" or "white man's house". Its streets are named after industrialists, aspects of industry and Gungahlin district pioneers.

Hackett
An Inner North suburb of Canberra, it was named after Sir John Winthrop Hackett (1848-1916), egislator, pioneer of Federation, educationalist and philanthropist of Western Australia; Editor of `West Australian' newspaper; elected to the State Legislative Council in 1894 and remained a Member until his death. The streets in Hackett are named after scientists.

Hall
A small town in the north of the ACT, it was founded in 1882, and named after the first landholder in the area, Henry Hall. In 1911, Hall was included within the boundary of the land allocated for the Australian Capital Territory, close to the north western corner, near the New South Wales border. Although considered a village, similar to Tharwa, in practical terms Hall might now be considered an outer suburb of Australia's capital Canberra.

Harman
A suburb in Canberra, it is located near Queanbeyan, New South Wales, but on the Australian Capital Territory side of the border. Harman is located south of Canberra Avenue. HMAS Harman is a multi-user base for Royal Australian Navy and Royal Australian Army forces. The "S" in HMAS stands for station and not ship, referring to the radio receiving station located there. The location was selected inland because it was safe from air, land and sea attacks.

The name Harman is derived from two surnames:
Director and Assistant Director of Signals; Commander Neville Harvey, of the Royal Navy
Lieutenant Commander J.S. Newman, of the Royal Australian Navy
Newman and Harvey were responsible for naming the a series of new naval stations in 1939. They sent proposals to the Australian Commonwealth Naval Board (ACNB) for approval. The Darwin station was called Coonawarra, a direction finding station near Perth was called Jandakot, the Ginninderra Creek station was called Belconnen. The ACNB showed little interest so as a joke Newman and Harvey proposed the combination of their names for the receiving station. This was approved by the ACNB.

Harrison
A suburb in the Canberra district of Gungahlin. The suburb began to be developed in 2006. Harrison is named after city planner Peter Harrison. The theme for the street names is "natural features, waterfalls, plains, tablelands and plateaux".

Hawker
A suburb of Canberra, in the district of Belconnen. The suburb of Hawker is named after Charles Hawker (1894-1938), Member of the House of Representatives from 1929-1938 and Federal minister in 1932. Streets in the suburb are named according to the theme of Northern Territory pastoral stations.

Higgins
A suburb in the Canberra district of Belconnen. The suburb is named after politician and judge Henry Bournes Higgins (1851-1929). It was gazetted on 6th June 1968. The streets of Higgins are named after Australian judges.

Holder
A suburb of Canberra, located in the district of Weston Creek. Holder was gazetted in 1970 and was named after Sir Frederick William Holder (1850-1909), KCMG; MHA, South Australia, 1887-1901; Treasurer, 1889-90; Commissioner for Public Works, 1893-94; Treasurer and Minister for the Northern Territory, 1894-99; Premier and Treasurer, 1899-1901; Member of Federal Convention, 1897; first Speaker of the House of Representatives, 1901-09. The theme for the street names in Holder is surveyors.

Holt
A suburb in the Canberra district of Belconnen. It is named after Harold Holt, Prime Minister of Australia from 1966 until his sudden death in 1967. It was gazetted on 2nd July 1970. Streets are named after sportsmen and sportswomen. It is one of the lower Socio-Economic areas of Canberra, with a distinctly working-class population.

Hughes
A suburb in the Canberra district of Woden. Hughes is named after William Morris "Billy" Hughes, Prime Minister, 1915-23; MLA, New South Wales from 1894 to 1901; MHR from 1901-52; served continuously for fifty-eight years in Parliament including as Member of the Advisory War Council, 1940-45. William Hughes' role as Prime Minister during World War I earned him the nickname of 'The Little Digger'. Streets in the suburb are named with the theme of World War I armed services personnel and contemporaries of William Hughes. The suburb was gazetted on 20th September 1962.

Hume
A suburb of Canberra in the district of Tuggeranong. The suburb is named after the explorer Hamilton Hume. He originally explored to the Berrima-Bong Bong district of NSW and within 2 years had penetrated to Bungonia; in 1818, at the request of Gov Macquarie, Hume accompanied Charles Throsby and James Meehan to the same area; Hume and Meehan pressed on and discovered Lake Bathurst and the Goulburn plains; went with Oxley and Meehan to Jervis Bay; with Lieutenant Johnston (in 1822) and Alexander Berry to the Clyde River; Berry and Hume moved inland almost to the site of Braidwood; with Hovell, he reached Corio Bay in Port Phillip; Hume found a new road over the Blue Mountains, though it was not adopted; in 1828 he was attached by Darling to Sturt's expedition and the party reached the Darling River; in 1860 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society; became a magistrate. Hume's streets are named after Australian industrialists and businessmen. Hume is a light-industrial suburb and there is no significant housing development, the population as of the 2001 census was 13 people.

Isaacs
A suburb in the district of Woden in Canberra, Australia. The suburb was gazetted as a Division Name on 12th May 1966 but residential housing was not built until the late 1980s. It is named after Isaac Isaacs (1855-1948), GCB; GCMG; MLA, Victoria, 1892-1901; Member of Federal Convention, 1897-98; Member of Constitutional Drafting Committee; MHR, 1901-06; Attorney-General, 1904-06; Justice of High Court, 1906-31; Chief Justice, 1930; first Australian born Governor-General, 1931-36. The suburb's theme is 'educationists': the streets are therefore named after people associated with education.

Isabella Plains
A suburb in the Canberra district of Tuggeranong. Explorers Captain Mark Currie RN, Major John Ovens, and Joseph Wild camped in the Tuggeranong area and named it Isabella's Plain in 1823, in honour of Isabella Maria Brisbane (1821-1849), the daughter of Sir Thomas Brisbane, Governor of New South Wales, 1821-25. The three men were on a Government expedition to find good grazing land and extend the limits of civilisation. The suburb was gazetted on 5th August 1975. Its streets recall New South Wales parish names.

Jacka
A designated suburb in Gungahlin, Canberra. The suburb is named after Albert Jacka, arguably Australia's greatest front-line soldier. Jacka was awarded the first Victoria Cross of World War I, 19-20 May 1915 at "Courtney's Post" Gallipoli; the Military Cross at Poziers, 1916; and Bar at Bullecourt in April 1917. In postwar years he was a popular St Kilda Councillor and was elected as Mayor one year before his death in 1932. He was considered an extraordinary leader of the ordinary man.

Kaleen
A suburb in the Canberra district of Belconnen. The suburb's name means 'water' in the language of the Wiradhuri Aboriginal tribe of the Central West of New South Wales. It was gazetted on 15 January 1974. The streets are named after Australian Rivers.

Kambah
The northernmost suburb in the district of Tuggeranong. Kambah was not designed according to the 'neighbourhood' philosophy guiding the design of other Canberra suburbs and is the largest suburb in the city with an area of 1130ha. It was first settled in 1974. It was the first suburb in the satellite city of Tuggeranong. Originally it was intended to be four separate suburbs, but only one name was available. Kambah was named after the Kambah farm originally in this area. The name Kambah derives from Ngambri, the name of the clan that originally lived in the area before European occupation. The same word is the origin for the name Canberra.

Kenny
A designated suburb in the Canberra district of Gungahlin. It is next to the suburbs of Watson, Mitchell, Harrison and Throsby. Its name honours nurse Elizabeth Kenny; responsible for devising a treatment for poliomyelitis during an epidemic in Queensland in 1933. Her methods were investigated and officially recognised by the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis in the USA in the 1940s. Its streets are named after nurses and nursing administrators.

Kingston
An early inner-south suburb of Canberra. Kingston is named after Charles Cameron Kingston, Premier of South Australia, 1893-99; represented South Australia at the Federal Council Meeting in 1889 and at the 1891 and 1897-98 Federal Conventions; Minister for Trade and Customs in the first Commonwealth Government. Two towns in South Australia are also named after Kingston. Streets in Kingston are named after explorers. Part of Kingston was designated as an area for the workers who built Canberra when the suburb was established in 1922. 120 portable wooden cottages for construction workers were built here in 1925 and 1926. In recent years Kingston has been largely redeveloped with medium density housing including townhouses and units.

Kinlyside
A designated suburb in Gungahlin. The suburb is named after George Kendall Kinlyside. From a well known pioneer family in the Ginninderra-Hall area; followed in his father's footsteps as wheelwright, coachbuilder and blacksmith at Hall; in 1907 he built a hall which served the Hall community for many years; active in local affairs and joint secretary of the Hall Progress Association when established in 1906. Its street names recall Australian country towns.

Latham
A suburb in the Canberra district of Belconnen. Established in 1971, the suburb is named for John Latham, Chief Justice of the High Court of Australia from 1935 to 1952. Ginninderra creek runs through Latham, and there are open areas of grassland nearby, such as the Umbagong district park.

Lawson
A suburb in the Canberra district of Belconnen. At the time of publication, Lawson does not have any suburban houses, consisting only of part of Lake Ginninderra, the Belconnen Naval Radio Station, and an open area of grassland where there is a reservoir and substation. The suburb is planned to be opened for residential development in the near future, with 500 blocks to be released adjacent to the Belconnen Naval Radio Station.

Lyneham
The suburb is named after Sir William Lyne, KCMG; Legislator; Premier of New South Wales from 1899 to 1901, Federalist and one of the Founders of the Constitution; Minister for Home Affairs in first Government; a key political figure in a crucial thirty year period of Australian history. The suburb was gazetted in 1928, but development did not commence until 1958. Its streets are named after mainly artists and people associated with the early development of Canberra.

Lyons
A suburb in the Canberra district of Woden. The suburb was named afer Joseph Aloysius Lyons; Prime Minister, 1931-39; MHA, Tasmania, 1909-29; Premier of Tasmania, 1923-29; MHR for Wilmot, 1929-39; Prime Minister from 1931 until his death in 1939. Streets in Lyons are named after locations in Tasmania.

Macarthur
A suburb in the Canberra district of Tuggeranong. The suburb is named after John Macarthur, one of the founders of Australia's Merino wool industry. Macarthur came to Australia as an Army officer in the notorious NSW Corps; he built Elizabeth Farm House in 1793 (later known as Camden Park Estate); his defiance of Gov Bligh triggered the Rum rebellion of 1808, a Member of reformed Legislative Council of New South Wales, 1829-32; one of the principal founders of the Merino Wool Industry in Australia. It was gazetted on 22nd March 1982 and first settled in 1983. The wool industry is the theme for street names.

Macgregor
A suburb in the Belconnen district of Canberra. It lies next to the suburbs of Dunlop, Latham and Holt on the western side of Belconnen, with Florey Drive the boundary to the east, Ginninderra Drive on the north, and Southern Cross Drive on the south. The suburb is named after William Macgreggor GCMG; CB; Governor of Queensland, 1909-14; first Chancellor of the University of Queensland, 1911.

Macquarie
Macquarie was gazetted as a division on 22nd June 1967 in recognition of Major-General Lachlan Macquarie, colonial Governor of New South Wales. Macquarie is located in the inner north Canberra district of Belconnen.

McKellar
A quiet suburb, sitting on a gentle hillside in Canberra in the Belconnen district. The suburb is named after Senator Gerald Colin McKellar, who was Minister for Repatriation from 1958-70. The suburb was gazetted on 15th January 1974. The streets are named after journalists.

Manuka
A precinct in the Inner South district of Canberra. Well-known landmarks such as Manuka Shops, Manuka Oval, Manuka Swimming Pool, and Manuka Circle often lead people to believe that there is a suburb called Manuka. This is not so: there is no official suburb of that name in Canberra, and the area generally known as Manuka covers parts of Griffith and Forrest. The precinct is named after Manuka Circle, the street which forms the northern boundary of the precinct.

The New Zealand Manuka Tea Tree, after which the locality is named Manuka Circle was on Walter Burley Griffin's original plan for Canberra and is named after the New Zealand tea tree Leptospermum scoparium. When Griffin drew up his plans in 1912, there was still some optimism that New Zealand might join the Federation of Australia. Griffin's plans included eight avenues radiating out from Capital Hill named after the capitals of the six states, the capital of the Northern Territory and the capital of New Zealand.

Griffin planned that the state capital city avenues were terminated with a park named after the generic botanical name for a native plant from that particular site; for example, Telopea Park is named after the waratah, the floral emblem of New South Wales, and is at the end of Sydney Avenue, named after the capital of New South Wales. Wellington Avenue was to terminate at Manuka Circle, which encircled Manuka Park. Before the name Wellington Avenue was gazetted it was realised that New Zealand was not going to become part of a Confederation of Australasia and the name was replaced by Canberra Avenue. Though Wellington Avenue was renamed Canberra Avenue theManuka Park and Manuka Circle were left unchanged.

Business allotments for Manuka were included in the first auction of city leases in December 1924. At the same time leases were sold in the city, Braddon, Kingston, Forrest and Red Hill. Lessees were required to erect buildings of approved design on the blocks within three years. The decision to develop business centres at both Kingston (then called Eastlake) and Manuka, which were within half a mile of each other had been made in the absence of Sir John Sulman, the chair of the Federal Capital Advisory Committee. He later recorded his disapproval of the decision. Sulman had designed Manuka and it was intended to be the principal commercial centre on the south side.

The name Manuka is pronounced differently to the tree from which it gets its name; it was changed after Queen Elizabeth II used the pronunciation now used for the precinct when referring to it in a speech. According to British Commonwealth protocol, the Queen pronounced it that way, so that is the way it is pronounced!

Mawson
A suburb in the Canberra, Australia district of Woden. The suburb was gazetted in 1966 and named after Sir Douglas Mawson OBE; Antarctic explorer; Lecturer from 1905-20; Professor of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Adelaide, 1921-52; Emeritus Professor, 1953-58; member of Shackleton Expedition, 1907-09; leader of Australasian Expedition, 1911-14; leader of British-Australasian and New Zealand Antarctic Expedition, 1929-31; knighted in 1914. The theme for street names is Antarctic exploration.

Melba
A suburb of Canberra, in the district of Belconnen. The suburb of Melba is named after Dame Nellie Melba (1861-1931), the first internationally-recognised Australian opera soprano. The streets are named after composers, singers and other musically notable Australians.

Mitchell
A light-industrial suburb in the district of North Canberra. Mitchell was named in honour of Major Sir Thomas Livingston Mitchell an explorer of inland New South Wales and Surveyor-General of New South Wales. The streets in Mitchell are named after Australian industrialists. There is no significant housing development in Mitchell and, as of the 2001 Australian census, only 3 people lived in Mitchell. It is one of the two areas in Canberra where prostitution is legal, along with Fyshwick. It was decriminalised in 1992.

Monash
A suburb in the district of Tuggeranong. The suburb is named after General Sir John Monash, (1865 to 1931), GCMG: KCB; UD; Outstanding Australian Army Commander in France in World War I; distinguished engineer and scholar; Chairman of Victorian Electricity Commission 1920 and responsible for development of Yallourn Power Station 1924. It was gazetted on 1st August 1975 and first settled in 1978. Streets are named after engineers.

Moncrieff
A planned suburb in the Canberra district of Gungahlin. Land for the suburb has been designated but as of 2005 building has not begun. Moncrieff was the only undeveloped Canberra Suburb to have a suburb sign erected. Its name recalls Gladys Moncrieff, star of musical comedies and operettas; as a result of her concerts to troops in World War II and in Korea she became known as `Our Glad'; heard by Dame Nellie Melba and on her recommendation offered a position by J C Williamson; made her debut in 'HMS Pinafore' in 1914. Its streets are named after musicians and other people associated with the field of music.

Mulangari
A planned designated suburb in the Gungahlin district of Canberra. It was planned for an area next to the suburbs of Kenny, Franklin, Gungahlin and Throsby, at the end of Wells Station Road. However, the area has now been occupied by the new suburb of Harrison, which commenced construction during 2005. The name is a Ngunnawal word meaning "alive" and "well-being". Its street names were to recall notable Aboriginal women.

Narrabundah
Narrabundah is an Aboriginal place name associated with the locality since the days of the early settlers. Streets in Narrabundah are named after indigenous names, explorers and pioneers. Narrabundah is bordered by the residential suburb of Red Hill to the west, Griffith to the north, the industrial area of Fyshwick to the east and undeveloped bushland and green fields to the south.

Ngunnawal
A suburb in the Canberra district of Gungahlin. The suburb is named after the Ngunawal people, the original Aboriginal tribe who inhabited the area. It was gazetted on 18th October 1991. Streets are named after Aboriginal people and Aboriginal words.

Nicholls
A suburb in the Canberra district of Gungahlin. The suburb is named after Sir Douglas Nicholls (1906-1988), a former Governor of South Australia. It was gazetted on 18th October 1991. Its streets are named after sportsmen and sportswomen. Sir Douglas Nicholls was Australia's first Aboriginal state governor. Nicholls was a social worker and a minister of the Church of Christ who worked for the rights of Aboriginal people. He spent a lot of his life working for groups that helped Aboriginal people, including the National Aboriginal Sports Foundation and the Aborigines' League of Advancement in Victoria. He was awarded two medals by Queen Elizabeth II and was made Sir Douglas Nicholls in 1972 because of his work for Aboriginal Australians.

Oaks Estate
A small settlement on the Australian Capital Territory side of the NSW-ACT border near Queanbeyan and the Molonglo River. Oaks Estate is directly connected to Queanbeyan by a bridge over the railway and was originally settled before the creation of ACT. Oaks Estate is named after the 'The Oaks', part of Robert Campbell's property Duntroon.

O'Connor
An Inner North suburb in Canberra. It lies between the suburbs of Lyneham and Turner. It was named after Richard Edward O'Connor (1851-1912), who was a judge in the High Court and a founder of the Australian constitution. Street names in O'Connor are named after explorers, Australian flora, legislators and pioneers. The suburb was gazetted on 20th September 1928 and was one of Canberra's original suburbs.

O'Malley
A suburb in the Canberra district of Woden Valley. The suburb is named after King O'Malley, MHA, South Australia 1896-99; MHR, 1901-17; Minister for Home Affairs 1910-13, 1915-16; during his term of office the competition for a design for the national capital was arranged. Streets in O'Malley are named with Aboriginal words.

Oxley
The smallest suburb in Canberra, it is located in the district of Tuggeranong. The suburb is named after the explorer John Joseph William Molesworth Oxley (1783 to 1828), Surveyor-General of New South Wales; with Allan Cunningham and Charles Fraser explored a large area of the Lachlan and Macquarie Rivers and discovered and named the Castlereagh River, Arbuthnot Range and Liverpool Plains, Hastings River and Port Macquarie, 1817-18; discovered the Brisbane River, 1823. It was gazetted on 22nd March 1982. and first settled in 1985. Streets are named after social reformers.

Page
A suburb of Canberra, in the district of Belconnen. The suburb is named in honour of Sir Earle Page, a former Prime Minister (caretaker Prime Minister, April 1939). Streets in Page are named in honour of Australian scientists.

Palmerston
A suburb in the Canberra district of Gungahlin. The suburb is named after George Thomas Palmer (1784-1854) who established a settlement in the Canberra region in 1826 called Palmerville, which was later renamed Ginninderra. It was gazetted on 20th March 1991. Its streets are named after mountains and mountrain ranges of Australia, with the main street called Kosciuszko Avenue.

Parkes
An inner suburb of Canberra. Located south of the Canberra CBD, Parkes contains the Parliamentary Triangle area. The population of Parkes on census night 2001 was just 24 people. Parkes contains many of Canberra's large institutions and contains no residential area. Parkes is named after Sir Henry Parkes, Legislator, Federalist and one of the Founders of the Constitution; became Premier of New South Wales 1872, advocating union of the Australian colonies from 1867; died 1896 before the first Federal Parliament. Streets in Parkes are either named after monarchs or are constitutional references. Parkes was established in 1922 in accordance with Walter Burley Griffin's original plan for Canberra.

Pialligo
Established as a suburb in 1928, Pialligo is a rural suburb of Canberra. The name first appeared on Surveyor Robert Dixon's map of 1820. It is supposedly an Aboriginal word for 'a place for a pow-wow', but is also said to mean 'I'll tell you by and by'. It was the name given to the parish in the area. Streets in Pialligo are named with Aboriginal words. Canberra International Airport is located adjacent to Pialligo across Pialligo Avenue.

Pearce
A suburb in the Canberra district of Woden. It was named after the longest-serving Senator and longest-serving Minister in Australia's federal history, Sir George Foster Pearce, KCVO; West Australian Member of Senate, 1901-38; Minister for Defence from 1908 in the first, second and third Fisher Ministries and in all four Hughes Ministries until 1921; Minister for Home and Territories, 1921-26; Minister for Defence, 1932-34, and Minister for External Affairs, 1934-37. Its streets recall contemporaries of Pearce.

Phillip
A suburb in the Canberra district of Woden. It is located in the centre of the district, and contains the district's main commercial centre, Woden Town Centre. The suburb is named after Captain Arthur Phillip, the first Governor of New South Wales. Phillip was chosen in 1786 to lead the expedition destined for Botany Bay, reaching the Bay on 18th January 1788; first Captain-General and Governor-in-Chief of New South Wales; settled Sydney Cove at Port Jackson. The suburb was gazetted on 12th May 1966. Streets in Phillip are named after early colonial pioneers.

Pierces Creek
A forestry settlement in the Australian Capital Territory. The ACT government agreed to redevelop this rural settlement in 2003. In 1991, a bushfire destroyed $1.5 million worth of pine trees at Pierces Creek. 12 of the original 13 homes at the settlement were destroyed in the January 2003 bushfires. In 2005, the ACT government and NCA planning authority were undecided about the future of Pierces Creek.

Red Hill
A suburb of Canberra, it is named after the northernmost hill of the ridge to the west of the suburb. The ridge is a reserve and managed as part of the Canberra Nature Park. The hill is an element of the central Canberra design axis. The Red Hill ridge forms the south-west boundary of the suburb. The ridge separates the central Canberra valley from Woden Valley. The northernmost peak is Red Hill, the Davidson Trig is on the middle point, and Mount Mugga is on the southernmost point of the ridge across Hindmarsh Drive. The name has been associated with the hill since the time of the early settlers, it was probably suggested by the red soil of the area. Its streets are named after explorers and explorers' ships.

Reid
Located directly next to Civic, Canberra's central business district, Reid is one of the oldest suburbs in Canberra. Reid is named after Australia's fourth Prime Minister (1904-05), Sir George Houstoun Reid, Federalist and one of the Founders of the Constitution; who formed a Government in August 1904 and held office until July 1905; entered the House of Representatives after having been Premier of New South Wales from 1894 to 1898. Separating the suburbs of Reid and Campbell is ANZAC Parade a ceremonial boulevarde, running along Canberra's primary design axis (the ceremonial axis) from Lake Burley Griffin to the Australian War Memorial. Most of Reid is a protected Historical Precinct.

Richardson
A suburb in the Canberra, Australia district of Tuggeranong. The suburb is named after author Ethel Richardson (1870-1946). She wrote under the pseudonym `Henry Handel Richardson'; novelist; published first novel 'Maurice Guest' in 1905; `Getting of Wisdom', published 1910; best known work a trilogy `The Fortunes of Richard Mahoney', 1930. It was gazetted on 5th May 1975. Streets are named after writers, particularly female writers.

Rivett
A residential suburb of Canberra, established in the late 1960s. Rivett takes its name from Sir (Albert Cherbury) David Rivett, KCMG; Rhodes Scholar, 1907; Professor of Chemistry, Melbourne University, 1924-1927; Deputy Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, CSIR, 1927-46; Chairman of the Council, CSIRO, 1946-49; President of Australian and New Zealand Association for the Advancement of Science, 1937-39. Rivett's streets are named after Australian flora.

Russell
An inner north suburb in Canberra, Australia. Russell is one of the smallest suburbs in Canberra, comprising a number of government offices but no private residences. It is probably best known for the headquarters of the Australian Defence Force, which is housed in the Russell Offices complex. The Australian American War Memorial is located in Russell. To the west lies Kings Park and Grevillea Park, on the shore of Lake Burley Griffin. The suburb's name has been associated with the locality for many years; the name was given to an adjacent trigonometrical station by Surveyor Scrivener in c. 1910, and later adopted as the name for an early settlement in the locality. Its street names honour armed services personnel.

Scullin
A suburb in the Canberra district of Belconnen. The suburb is named after Prime Minister James Henry Scullin. It was gazetted on 6th June 1968. Its streets are named after aviators. For the purposes of Australian Federal elections for the House of Representatives, Scullin is in the Division of Fraser.

Spence
A suburb in the Belconnen district of Canberra. The suburb is named after William Spence (1846-1926), one of the founders of the Australian Workers' Union and later a member of the first Australian House of Representatives. It was gazetted on 2nd November 1972. Streets are named after trade unionists. Spence is next to the suburbs of Fraser, Melba and Evatt. Nearby is a CSIRO property.

Stirling
A suburb of Canberra, located in the Weston Creek district. The suburb is named after Sir James Stirling (1791- 1865) who was the first Governor of Western Australia between 1829-1839 and established settlements at Perth and Fremantle in 1829. He explored south-western coastal districts; knighted in 1831. The suburb was gazetted in 1970. Its street names recall Western Australian pioneers.

Symonston
A primarily industrial and agricultural suburb of Canberra, Symonston is named after Sir Josiah Symon KCMG; Legislator, Federalist and one of the Founders of the Constitution; elected House of Assembly South Australia for Sturt, 1881-87; Attorney-General 1881; Member of Australasian Federal Convention 1897-98; elected to Senate for South Australia, 1901, 1906. The Symonston area has traditionally been denoted 'Broadacre' area by the planning authorities, meaning that it has retained a traditionally rural character with some larger institution uses, particularly by the Australian Defence Force and Geoscience Australia. With the release of the Canberra Spatial Plan by the ACT Government, the area and the adjoining Majura Valley has been denoted as an employment corridor centred on Canberra Airport and Fyshwick.

Taylor
A designated suburb in Gungahlin, Canberra. The land designated for the suburb has not yet been released for development by the Australian Capital Territory's Land and Development Agency (LDA). The suburb is named after Florence Mary Taylor OBE, Australia's first female architect, engineer and town planner; associate of the Royal Australian Institute of Architects; wrote for a number of journals including the magazine `Building'; awarded OBE in 1939.

Tharwa
A small village within the ACT, 35 kilometres south of Canberra. The village is located on the banks of the Murrumbidgee River and at the junction of Tidbinbilla, Nass and Tharwa Roads. Tharwa is the oldest official settlement in the Australian Capital Territory, proclaimed a settlement in 1862. Tharwa was named after the Aboriginal word for Mount Tennent, the overlooking mountain which is part of Namadgi National Park. Mount Tennent was named after John Tennant, who was one the earliest and best-known bushrangers in the region. John Tennant lived in a hideout on the mountain behind Tharwa from which he raided local homesteads 1827-1828, before being arrested and transported to Norfolk Island. There is no theme in the naming of Tharwa's streets.

Theodore
A suburb in the Canberra, Australia district of Tuggeranong. The suburb is named after Edward Granville Theodore (1884-1950), a Queensland premier, Federal treasurer and deputy Prime Minister. It was gazetted on 5th August 1975 but its construction did not commence until 11 years later. Streets are named after people involved with the civilian war effort during the world wars.

Throsby
A new suburb in the Canberra district of Gungahlin. It is next to the suburb of Kenny. Land for the suburb has been designated but as of 2005 development had not commenced. The name recalls ship's surgeon and explorer Dr Charles Throsby. He discovered Lake Bathurst, Lake George and the Murrumbidgee River, 1820; followed the Molonglo and Queanbeyan Rivers, starting from Lake George and penetrated to the present Federal Capital Territory, 1821.

Torrens
A suburb in the Woden Valley district of Canberra. It is located along the district's southern edge. The suburb is named after Sir Robert Torrens, MLC, South Australia, 1851-56; MHA, 1856-58; Premier of South Australia, 1857; in 1857-58 was responsible for introducing and carrying through the Real Property Act which simplified the conveyancing of land titles in South Australia, known elsewhere as the Torrens System of Land Title Registration, it is widely adopted throughout the world. The suburb was gazetted on 12th May 1966. Streets in Torrens are named after South Australian pioneers.

Tuggeranong
Tuggeranong Town Centre services the southernmost Canberra district of Tuggeranong. It is located on the south-western side of Lake Tuggeranong, from which it takes its name. The name is of Aboriginal origin.

Turner
A leafy Canberra suburb and one of the origtinal suburbs (1928), Turner is close to Civic and the Australian National University (located south in Acton). Turner is named after George Turner, KCMG; Legislator, Federalist and one of the Founders of the Constitution; Victoria's first Australian-born Premier, represented the State at the Federal Conventions of 1895 and 1897-98; Treasurer in first Commonwealth Government. Streets in Turner are mostly named after writers, legislators and pioneers.

Uriarra
A settlement in the Australian Capital Territory. It had been a forestry settlement from the 1920s to the 1980s. The 2003 bushfires destroyed 16 houses in Uriarra, with only 6 houses still standing afterwards. 15 families moved away from the settlement, with 6 remaining. In 2007 the ACT government decided to redevelop the settlement as a rural village, and development of new roads and infrastructure commenced. The name is of Aboriginal origin.

Watson
A suburb in the North Canberra district of Canberra. Watson is named in honour of John Christian Watson, and was gazetted on 7th April 1960. Watson was the third Prime Minister of the Commonwealth, and first Labour Prime Minister of the Commonwealth April-August 1904; he became prominent in the Labour movement in 1893 when elected President of the Sydney Trades and Labour Council at the age of twenty-six; elected to Federal Parliament 1901 and appointed Leader of the Labour Party; retired 1910. Streets in Watson are named after Australian judges and other legal professionals.

Weetangera
A suburb in the Canberra, Australia district of Belconnen. The Canberra Nature Park of The Pinnacle Nature Reserve borders it to the south across Springvale Drive. It is named after the property purchased by Samuel Shumack in 1861, which in turn had been given a name of Aboriginal origin. It was also the name for the Weetangera parish, which included the land from Ginninderra Creek to the Molonglo River.

Woden
Woden is the name of a district of Canberra. Woden Town Centre is located in the district of Woden. The building of Woden was begun in the 1960s. Woden Town Centre is technically located within the Canberra suburb of Phillip, although it is thought of as being a town centre, not part of a suburb. Woden has a major shopping mall and a large bus interchange. The tallest building in Canberra, the 22 story (90m high) Lovett Tower, is located at Woden. The suburb is named after Woden Homestead, which was built on land in the Canberra region granted to Dr James Fitzgerald Murray in about 1830. Woden derives its name from Ther Norse God of War who was also the patron of learning.

Yarralumla
A large inner south suburb of Canberra. Located approximately 3.5 kilometers south-west of the city centre, Yarralumla extends along the south-west bank of Lake Burley Griffin. Europeans first settled the area in 1828, and it was named Yarralumla in 1834 from the indigenous Ngunnawal people's name for the area (It is also spelt "Yarrowlumla" on some 19th century documents). Yarralumla homestead, which now serves as the site of Government House, the official residence of the Governor-General of Australia Frederick Campbell, grandson of Robert Campbell who built nearby Duntroon, completed the construction of Yarralumla, a large, gabled, brick house on his property in 1891 that now serves as the site of Government House, the official residence of the Governor-General of Australia. Though the modern suburb of Yarralumla was officially gazetted in 1928, its layout bears only a passing resemblance to that shown in Walter Burley Griffin's original plans for Canberra. It was originally to be called Westlake.

Wanniassa
A suburb in the Canberra district of Tuggeranong. It is located towards the north of the district. The suburb is named after an early local name for the Tuggeranong district. It was a property name associated with landowner Thomas MacQuoid. He was the Sheriff to the Supreme Court of NSW who, in 1835, purchased land here. MacQuoid, in 1815, had owned land at Wanajassa on the Indonesian island of Java. The Wanniassa estate was founded in 1835. The suburb was gazetted on 21st May 1974. Streets are named after Victorian state politicians.

Waramanga
A suburb of Canberra,located in the district of Weston Creek. Waramanga was established in the late 1960s and was named after an Aboriginal tribe of Central Australia, also known as Warramunga. The theme for the street names in Waramanga is Aboriginal tribal units.

Weston
A suburb of Canberra, Weston was named after a former homestead built in the area sometime around 1835. The Weston Creek grant was once held by Captain Edward Weston the Superintendent of the Hyde Park Barracks, Sydney. Streets in Weston are named after artists.